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You're invited to attend public lectures by two candidates for the position of Lecturer, Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in the School of Information Management. Full details below. No RSVP required. These lectures will not be live-streamed or recorded. Please feel free to share. Thank you.


  *   November 23: 10:45 - 11:45, Room 3089
     *   Candidate - Nadia Conroy
     *   Title - Group Management and Affective Dialogue in Collaborative Work
     *   Abstract - Research and design of information systems in LIS has endeavoured to investigate human group tasks and the role of creativity. The current study builds on the premise behind Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), which is a design field aimed to facilitate group work through the application of computer technologies, driven by ever-changing contextual and environmental constraints. Using field observation, and a systematic quantification of the content of group conversation, the study formulates a description of the creative work of musicians, and the use of group management and affective dialogue during collaboration, with the goal of informing design. Results of the quantitative findings are presented with implications for future research.



  *   November 24: 10:45 - 11:45, Room 3089
     *   Candidate - Sepideh Ebrahimi
     *   Title - Demographic Transparency to Combat Data Analytics Discriminatory Recommendations
     *   Abstract - Data Analytics (DA) has been blamed for contributing to discriminatory managerial decisions in organizations. To date, most studies have focused on the technical antecedents of such discriminations. As a result, little is known about how to ameliorate the problem by focusing on the human aspects of decision making when using DA in organizational settings. This study represents an effort to address this gap. Drawing on the cognitive elaboration model of ethical decision-making, construal level theory, and the literature on moral intensity, this study investigates how the availability and the design of demographic transparency (a form of decisional guidance) can lower DA users' likelihood of agreement with discriminatory recommendations of DA tools. In addition, this study examines the role of user's mindfulness and organizational ethical culture on this process. This paper outlines the experimental methodology employed to empirically validate the proposed model and hypotheses and delineates contributions to theory and practice.